Overcoming implicit bias in the tropical science community for better conservation research and practice
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Symposium

Overcoming implicit bias in the tropical science community for better conservation research and practice

Part 1: Tue, July 12, 10:30 - 12:30hrs, Room Barahona 2

Part 2: Tue, July 12, 14:00 - 16:00 hrs, Room Barahona 2

Organizer(s):

Bea Maas, Carolina Ocampo-Ariza, Manuel Toledo-Hernández

This symposium on implicit bias in the tropical scientific community will highlight the untapped potential of improved inclusion and multidisciplinary cooperation for biodiversity conservation by presenting latest findings from conservation research and practice that will be discussed with respect to opportunities and challenges for conserving tropical biodiversity.

Diverse groups with different perspectives are often better at solving problems. In the era of a sixth mass extinction, conserving endangered tropical biodiversity requires an efficient uptake of research and expert knowledge. This can only be achieved by taking into account diverse scientific perspectives and stakeholder interests. Current research on the topic, however, indicates that the international scientific leadership is largely dominated by male scientists from the Global North, and that conservation science is still not put into practice as often as it could be. In particular, ecologists from various megadiverse and populous countries (i.e. China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia) are still highly underrepresented in the global scientific community, and we lack conservation research and action from many biodiversity hotspots with rapidly increasing numbers of threatened species. These findings call for a thorough investigation and discussion of research findings, knowledge gaps, challenges and opportunities associated with unintended but implicit bias in tropical scientific communities, and how this affects conservation. This symposium will highlight the untapped potential of improved inclusion and multidisciplinary cooperation for biodiversity conservation by presenting latest findings from tropical conservation research and practice.   The speakers in our symposium will present current findings on the diversity of scientific communities in international publishing and research, as well as on the various benefits of transdisciplinary cooperation, science communication and science-policy interactions to promote co-production of knowledge and efficient implementation of research into practice. By looking at different examples from various geographic regions and sub-disciplines of tropical biology, challenges and opportunities are identified that pursue a common call to conservation science: Diversity and inclusion should be promoted in scientific communities to create more representative research landscapes that jointly work towards better solutions for biodiversity conservation in the tropics.   This symposium will be accessible and broadcasted online, and will consist of both on-site and online presentations to enable a multidisciplinary exchange with a wide audience from the broad international conservation science community. We would also like to provide a live translation into Spanish, the language of the host country. In a concluding discussion with the entire audience, key issues and questions will be identified to provide a baseline for a conceptual synthesis paper or survey/review study on the topic.


Overcoming implicit bias in ecology and conservation publishing
Bea Maas*, Robin Pakeman, Laurent Godet, Linnea Smith, Vincent Devictor and Richard Primack

Opportunities at the science-conservation interface
Jean Paul Metzger* and Marisa Mamede

Implementing Transdisciplinary and Sustainability Science for Conservation Research and Practices in the Tropics
Damayati Buchori*, David Ardhian, Larissa D. Salaki and Bonie Dewantara

Tropical Biology on Boots: Challenges and Strategies to promote inclusion and equity in fieldwork
Ximena Bernal*

Conservation in the tropics: From ecological theory to transdisciplinary practice
Alejandro Ortega-Argueta*

Transdisciplinary conservation requires long term collaboration with patience, listening and the pursuit of justice: reflections on jaguar conservation in Mexico
Birgit Schmook*, Lou Lecuyer, Sophie Calmé and Rehema White

Community-based monitoring and the inventory of birds in Colombia: Examples from the Andes to the Amazon
Orlando Acevedo-Charry, Diego Rocha*, Flor Peña-Alzate, Jorge Muñoz-García, William Daza-Diaz, Brayan Coral Jaramillo and Edilson Rosero


Consequences of language barriers in ecology and conservation
Tatsuya Amano*

Challenges to guaranteeing inclusion and equity to women in science: An intercultural approach with emphasis on Latin America
Bibiana Rojas*

Presentations